Category Archives: Game music tips

The cost of licensing a song for a game

If you’ve considered licensing an existing, published song for your game, be sure to check out this interesting post about one game developer’s experiences:
 

So I thought it would be really cool to license a known pop song for the trailer for our upcoming game Spellirium. I realized there would be a cost involved, of course, but since I’m trying to run a legit business, I didn’t just want to snake the song and throw the trailer up on YouTube. That’s not cool.

 
Be sure to read the full post for an interesting insight into the challenges and obstacles of music licensing.
 
Sometimes, it’s simply easier to go with royalty-free music, or, best of all, bring a great composer in for some custom music for your game.


Posted by Asbjoern on September 19, 2013 - Contact



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How to get game audio right: Make an audio design doc

Getting Game Audio Right

 
Getting the audio done for your game can seem a daunting task, but Microsoft Audio Director Zack Quarles(X-men: Legends, FEAR 360, Quake 4, Wolfenstein & more) has written a great guide that can make this a lot easier for you.
 

I often get asked how I “start” a project.  This is a big question.  Multiple things happen all at the same time, but one of the “filters” that I generally use to collect all of these items into a centralized place is the Audio Design Document (also called an audio style guide, sonic bible, etc…).  This becomes a road-map for myself, the audio team, and the project team as a whole on how I guide the audio component of any project that I’m on.

 
Read Zack’s full guide to creating an audio design document for your project here!
 


Posted by Asbjoern on January 16, 2013 - Contact



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Game sound editing: Five great tools


 
If you need to edit the sound for your game – be it the music, sound effects or voices – Lifehacker has highlighted five great audio editors that can help you do just that.
 
I can personally recommend Soundforge and Sony Vegas (multitrack editor) as well – they’re really great for serious editing, tweaking and polishing your game sound.
 

Earlier in the week, we asked you which audio editing tools you thought were the best. We tallied up your responses, and now we’re back to feature the five applications you said were the best of breed. It’s worth noting the list will be a bit of a mix of Digital Audio Workstations (DAWs) as well as audio editors—they’re definitely different classes of tools. If you’re not sure of the difference, audio editors let you manage and splice existing audio files, while DAWs are more for creating new music from scratch. Now, on to the top five:

 
See the full list of audio editors here!

 


Posted by Asbjoern on September 3, 2012 - Contact



Category Game music tips Tags , , , , ,

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