Need American game voice actors? Here they are!

If you need American male voices for your game project – for trailers, narration or character voices – I’ve hand-picked some of the finest voice actors around.
Check out their previews below, and get in touch if you’d like to book any of them for your project. Enjoy! :)
 

 


Posted by Asbjoern on March 11, 2013 - Contact



Category Game voices Tags , , , , , , , , , ,

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New Game Music For Kids

Fun Music For Kids

 
If you need game music for kids, be sure to check out my latest tracks – They’re available for instant previewing and download right here:

 
Fantastic Fun Toon
A festive, up-beat cartoony theme for children, featuring marimba, tuba, piano, flutes and pizzicato – great for kids’ TV, games and animations!
 
Backyard Building 
A playful track for kids featuring an ukulele melody, piano, percussion and pizzicato. Great for all kinds of projects for children – especially ones with a science or inventive theme.
 
Sleepy Time
A sweet melodic track for kids, played with acoustic guitar and piano. Works really well to create a warm, comfy atmosphere – perhaps for bedtime stories or cozying up with the family.
 
And if you need more music for children, there are many more tracks available for you right here.
 
Hope you like them and put them to good use in your project :)
 


Posted by Asbjoern on March 4, 2013 - Contact



Category Music For Games,Music For Kids Tags , , , , , , , , ,

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How to get game audio right: Make an audio design doc

Getting Game Audio Right

 
Getting the audio done for your game can seem a daunting task, but Microsoft Audio Director Zack Quarles(X-men: Legends, FEAR 360, Quake 4, Wolfenstein & more) has written a great guide that can make this a lot easier for you.
 

I often get asked how I “start” a project.  This is a big question.  Multiple things happen all at the same time, but one of the “filters” that I generally use to collect all of these items into a centralized place is the Audio Design Document (also called an audio style guide, sonic bible, etc…).  This becomes a road-map for myself, the audio team, and the project team as a whole on how I guide the audio component of any project that I’m on.

 
Read Zack’s full guide to creating an audio design document for your project here!
 


Posted by Asbjoern on January 16, 2013 - Contact



Category Game music tips Tags , , , , , , ,

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Need Christmas music? Here are some hand-picked tracks, ready to use!


If you need some Christmas music for your project – for use in your game, with greeting cards, on your web page, or for other marketing and promo purposes, for example – I’ve just made a special collection of 15 tracks that you can start using right now.
 
Hear the Christmas tracks below – and if you want to license a track, click the black BUY button to hop on over to the licensing page.
 
Hope you enjoy them, and happy holidays!

 


 


Posted by Asbjoern on December 10, 2012 - Contact



Category Royalty-free game music Tags , , , , , ,

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6 Great WordPress Templates For Composers And Musicians

 

If you’re a composer or musician, having a webpage – with a blog – is essential to making you visible online. When I was setting up this site, I first considered building it from scratch, but seeing how many useful templates that were out there, I decided to go down that road instead.
 
The great thing about WordPress is that, not only is it a fantastic solution for blogging – you can essentially run your entire web site from within it too. This includes your music demo reel pages, bio pages, news, your resources section and pretty much anything else you throw at it. And they all run within the WordPress framework, making it easy to tweak and manage all your pages.
 
However, a LOT of the templates I found were near-useless for composers, so it took me a lot of searching to find the best ones that’d work for showcasing your music, help build your online presence and look good doing it. Here are some of my favorites:
 


 

EEPROM
I really like the look of this theme. It’s stylish, features a good player, great options for the visuals and has loads of subpages you can customize to your liking. I do miss some more colour options, but if you know a bit of coding and image editing, you can adjust this yourself.

  • Get The ThemePreview the theme
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    MUSIC PRO
    A slick-looking music theme with an integrated MP3-player. If you’re a fan of a darker look, this could be great to build on for a composer or musician. It also has a simple store built-in if you want to sell your music on-site.
     

  • Get The ThemePreview the theme
  •  


     

    SOUNDBOARD
    SoundBoard is mainly geared towards bands, but it can work well for composers with a bit of tweaking. You can adjust the colours and typeface to your preferred look, and it features the great JW player built-in for playback. You can also use SoundCloud shortcodes, if you prefer that.

  • Get The ThemePreview the theme
  •  


     

    MUSAIC
    A bit older than some of the other themes here, but still has a nice look – and good to see some lighter colours for a change. Uses the WP-audio player for playback, has good navigation and has a front page that really puts the spotlight on the music.
     

  • Get The ThemePreview the theme
  •  


     

    MEDIASCENE
    This theme really focuses on albums. Takes a bit more tweaking to customize to individual musicians when it comes to playback, but has lots of options for adjusting the visuals such as fonts, backgrounds and sliders. I personally prefer some of the other themes here, but your mileage may vary.

  • Get The ThemePreview the theme
  •  


     

    PENDULUM
    Another theme from the same team who did the EEPROM theme. It has a band slant, but it’s fairly easy to modify for individual composers and musicians. The portfolio template pages are really nice and have an audio player built-in, making it easy to showcase your music.

  • Get The ThemePreview the theme
  •  


     

    Found any other great WordPress templates for musicians and composers? Do share in the comments below!


    Posted by Asbjoern on October 16, 2012 - Contact



    Category Composer tips Tags , , , , , , , , , , ,

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    Royalty-free game music composers: Avoid going exclusive!

     

     

    Getting into royalty-free music can be a good approach if you’re a game composer looking to earn more, and potentially land new clients as well.

     

    But there’s one thing you should carefully consider before embarking on your royalty-free music adventure: Do you want to sell your royalty-free music exclusively or non-exclusively?

     

    When signing up as a new author, many stock music sites ask you if you want to be an exclusive or non-exclusive author on the site. For any royalty-free music site, having unique content is a valuable asset, and that’s why they really want you to go exclusive.

     

    Being a non-exclusive author means that you put your music up for sale on the royalty-free music site, but you can freely sell the music elsewhere as well. Being exclusive means that only the given royalty-free music site can sell the tracks you submit to the site (note: You can still do whatever you want with tracks you haven’t submitted for exclusive sale on a site).

     

    The commission is of course higher if you’re an exclusive author rather than a non-exclusive one (50%+ commission vs 33% commission per sale), so it could be tempting.

     

    But don’t go exclusive, unless you know exactly what you’re doing and have a clear plan in mind!

    If you do, you could be severely limiting your options for making money off the music in other contexts.

     

    Here are three reasons why you shouldn’t go exclusive:

     

     

    1. You can’t try out different sites

    There are hundreds of royalty-free music sites around, and picking the right one for you is almost a science in itself.

     

    Some sites offer great commissions on tracks, but may not have a huge number of potential buyers, others sell tracks at a higher price and have bigger-budget buyers who purchase fewer tracks but are willing to pay more, while others still may attract a certain crowd of buyers who are going for very specific genres.

     

    It can be hard to tell from the get-go what works best for your music, so you want to test the waters before uploading all your music and locking yourself in with just one site.

     

    Upload a good selection of tracks to each site and see where your music sells. When you find a site that generates good sales numbers, focus on building your catalogue on that site.

     

    If you go exclusive from the beginning, you lose this important way of determining what site is right for you.

     

    2. You can’t sell direct to your clients

    As a game composer, there’s a clear advantage in maintaining a catalogue of tracks you can sell on a non-exclusive basis. Perhaps you’ve been brought in as a custom composer on a game project and the client wants more music than initially planned. Only problem is that the client has almost used up their entire music budget. Being able to offer a few tracks on a non-exclusive basis ensures that they get the music they need, and you make a sale in a situation where you wouldn’t have otherwise if you had to compose all-new music for them.

     

    Just make sure your client is aware that they’re getting those tracks on a non-exclusive basis to avoid misunderstandings down the line.

     

    And the best part is that you can sell that music again and again, so while the initial price may be low, you can still turn a healthy profit on it from repeat sales – and keep your clients happy at the same time.

     

     

    3. You can’t sell your music on your own site

    Royalty-free music sites take a large chunk out of your profits in commission (40%-70%, depending on the site). And what do you get from the money you’re essentially paying them for selling your tracks? They do the legwork of bringing in buyers for your tracks, allow you to have a nice-looking profile on their site and sometimes even feature your work to allow you sell more.

     

    But what if you’re pretty good at marketing yourself?

     

    If you’ve got the skills and the right eyeballs on your website – ie. game developers -, maybe you’d be better off selling your music on your own site.

     

    That way, you can set your own price, cut out the middleman eating half or more of your profits – and get more direct contact with your clients too.

     

    Build a catalogue of your tracks, sort them and label with fitting descriptions, tags and other relevant info, define your licensing terms and allow your visitors to buy the tracks via Paypal or similar services. You can even do this while still having music up on stock music sites.

     

    If you’re an exclusive author on a stock music site, you just can’t do this with material you’re selling exclusively on that site. So you’d be missing out on yet another way of reaching potential buyers.

     

     

    If you find that a royalty-free music site is really good at selling your stuff, you can always change your mind down the road and go exclusive. You just have to stop selling your selected tracks via all other channels. Alternatively, you can set up a separate account on your favorite music site where you upload tracks that are only sold through that site.

     

     

    I hope this has given you an idea on why going non-exclusive is probably the best approach for you. How are you going about selling your music as a games composer? Share your tips and ideas in the comments below.

     

    Good luck with your music!

     

    – Asbjoern


    Posted by Asbjoern on October 8, 2012 - Contact



    Category Game composers,Music For Games Tags , , , , ,

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    Game sound editing: Five great tools


     
    If you need to edit the sound for your game – be it the music, sound effects or voices – Lifehacker has highlighted five great audio editors that can help you do just that.
     
    I can personally recommend Soundforge and Sony Vegas (multitrack editor) as well – they’re really great for serious editing, tweaking and polishing your game sound.
     

    Earlier in the week, we asked you which audio editing tools you thought were the best. We tallied up your responses, and now we’re back to feature the five applications you said were the best of breed. It’s worth noting the list will be a bit of a mix of Digital Audio Workstations (DAWs) as well as audio editors—they’re definitely different classes of tools. If you’re not sure of the difference, audio editors let you manage and splice existing audio files, while DAWs are more for creating new music from scratch. Now, on to the top five:

     
    See the full list of audio editors here!

     


    Posted by Asbjoern on September 3, 2012 - Contact



    Category Game music tips Tags , , , , ,

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    Royalty-free game music – composer spotlight: Dramatic music

    If you’re looking for dramatic music for your game, British composer Russell Bell is releasing some really great stuff. Here is a collection of his royalty-free tracks in a dramatic, cinematic style which work great in a game context. Check them out below and click the black BUY button to get the currently-playing track.
     


    Posted by Asbjoern on August 29, 2012 - Contact



    Category Game composers,Royalty-free game music Tags , , , ,

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    Get $500 worth of content for.. $20!

    Get $500 worth of content for $20 from Envato

     

    Heads up: Envato is having a birthday sale, and is selling $500 worth of content for $20!

     

    For that price, you get six full music tracks + 8 website templates, 6 customizable videos, 4 web tools, 15 stock photos, 3 3D-files, 7 graphic files and 3 Flash objects. Quite a steal!

     

    For a limited time, you can see, hear and buy the whole lot here for $20.
     


    Posted by Asbjoern on August 20, 2012 - Contact



    Category Royalty-free game music Tags , , ,

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    How to get started in game music


     

    If you’re a composer looking to get started in game music, I’ve written a guest blog post over at the Music Composer Blog with tips and ideas to help you do just that. Have a look!
     


    Posted by Asbjoern on August 14, 2012 - Contact



    Category Game composers Tags , , ,

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